Red Hawk Fasteners are designed to be used with staplers and nailers that are specifically designed to accept composite staples and nails. They will not be driven successfully by tools designed for steel staples and nails. Check with us before you proceed. We have listed the fasteners and tools that work together as a fastening system.

Composite fasteners offer many benefits to engineers, woodworkers and end users however; they do present challenges, too. The mechanical properties of glass reinforced resins are different than steel. Driving staples and nails becomes more challenging as the materials being driven become more dense and harder. Since composite fasteners flash bond and offer exceptional holding power, a shorter fastener can be used. This will create a better driving experience without sacrificing quality of workmanship. Please review our Wood Species Drivability Chart for your specific application.

Currently, Red Hawk staples and nails can be used with carbide molder knives. High speed molder knives will be damaged by the fiberglass content in our standard product.

Operator technique is more important with Red Hawk composite staples nails than with steel fastener staplers and nailers. The tools must be held more steadily and with more conviction than steel fastener tools. Experienced tool users may need to refine their technique in order to successfully drive composite staples and nails.

Do not countersink your fasteners. Red Hawk fasteners should be driven to the surface of your material or slightly above it. This will achieve several benefits. They include: The exposed fastener can be sanded away easily which eliminates the need to go back and dig out unsightly crowns, nail heads, etc. It also reduces the need for surface repair, wood fillers, etc. The remaining exposed composite “filler” material can be stained or painted and blended into the final product. Also note: Red Hawk staplers and nailers are specifically designed with short driver blades to ensure that the fastener will not be countersunk.

Red Hawk staplers and nailers are engineered to be operated at 90 psi for optimal performance. Pressures above 90 psi only create additional wear and tear on internal parts and can cause the fastener to be overdriven into softer materials. Air pressure can be regulated below 90 psi to prevent the fasteners from countersinking. Prior to production, test and adjust pressure with scrap material to ensure the proper driving depth.

Use the shortest fastener possible to get the job accomplished. Longer is not better! There is no advantage in using a longer nail to increase holding power with most applications. As a general rule for Red Hawk brads and finish nails, 3/8” penetration into your substrate will achieve maximum holding power. Anything longer is a waste of material and can create drivability issues. The exception to the rule is for materials like Balsa wood and foam where no bonding occurs and longer nails will hold better.

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Red Hawk Fasteners are designed to be used with staplers and nailers that are specifically designed to accept composite staples and nails. They will not be driven successfully by tools designed for steel staples and nails. Check with us before you proceed. We have listed the fasteners and tools that work together as a fastening system.

Composite fasteners offer many benefits to engineers, woodworkers and end users however; they do present challenges, too. The mechanical properties of glass reinforced resins are different than steel. Driving staples and nails becomes more challenging as the materials being driven become more dense and harder. Since composite fasteners flash bond and offer exceptional holding power, a shorter fastener can be used. This will create a better driving experience without sacrificing quality of workmanship. Please review our Wood Species Drivability Chart for your specific application.

Currently, Red Hawk staples and nails can be used with carbide molder knives. High speed molder knives will be damaged by the fiberglass content in our standard product.

Operator technique is more important with Red Hawk composite staples nails than with steel fastener staplers and nailers. The tools must be held more steadily and with more conviction than steel fastener tools. Experienced tool users may need to refine their technique in order to successfully drive composite staples and nails.

Do not countersink your fasteners. Red Hawk fasteners should be driven to the surface of your material or slightly above it. This will achieve several benefits. They include: The exposed fastener can be sanded away easily which eliminates the need to go back and dig out unsightly crowns, nail heads, etc. It also reduces the need for surface repair, wood fillers, etc. The remaining exposed composite “filler” material can be stained or painted and blended into the final product. Also note: Red Hawk staplers and nailers are specifically designed with short driver blades to ensure that the fastener will not be countersunk.

Red Hawk staplers and nailers are engineered to be operated at 90 psi for optimal performance. Pressures above 90 psi only create additional wear and tear on internal parts and can cause the fastener to be overdriven into softer materials. Air pressure can be regulated below 90 psi to prevent the fasteners from countersinking. Prior to production, test and adjust pressure with scrap material to ensure the proper driving depth.

Use the shortest fastener possible to get the job accomplished. Longer is not better! There is no advantage in using a longer nail to increase holding power with most applications. As a general rule for Red Hawk brads and finish nails, 3/8” penetration into your substrate will achieve maximum holding power. Anything longer is a waste of material and can create drivability issues. The exception to the rule is for materials like Balsa wood and foam where no bonding occurs and longer nails will hold better.